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Serving Detroit (Oakland, Macomb, Wayne, Washtenaw, and Livingston Counties)

and all surrounding cities: Allen Park, Ann Arbor, Auburn Hills, Belleville, Berkley, Birmingham,

Bloomfield Hills, Brighton, Canton, Chelsea, Chesterfield Township, Clarkston, Commerce, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Detroit, Eastpointe, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Ferndale, Franklin, Fowlerville, Garden City, Grosse Pointe, Hamtramck, Howell, Huntington Woods, Keego Harbor, Lake Orion, Lathrup Village, Livonia, Madison Heights, Milford, Mount Clemens, New Boston, Northville, Novi, Plymouth, Redford, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Royal Oak, St. Clair Shores, Salem, South Lyon, Southfield, Troy, Waterford, Westland, West Bloomfield, Wixom, Wyandotte, Ypsilanti and more!

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After Baby - Postpartum Depression for Women and Men

March 26, 2018

 

Now that your precious baby is here…

 

How are you feeling? Emotional, exhausted, overwhelmed and yet, so in love?

 

Are you struggling? Maybe not recovering like you wished?

 

Where are your support people? Friends? Family? Spouse?

 

Having a baby can be the most trying time for new parents. You want it to appear like all things are going perfectly, but honestly, you are suffering inside. Getting up, a shower, and even feeding yourself are tasks that are met with difficulty.

You are not alone!

Many new parents find themselves in a time of despair. They are desperate to reclaim their bodies and life as they once knew it. As many as 1 in 7 women suffer from Postpartum Depression.

Did you know that men can also suffer postnatal? Yes, it is true. PPND (Paternal Postnatal Depression) can have crippling, lifelong effects. 1 in 4 new fathers may experience PPND. PPND is more common when the spouse is also suffering from Postpartum Depression.

Here is what to look for:

Women

  • Mood swings

  • Uncontrollable weeping

  • Lack of bonding with your baby

  • Withdrawing from others

  • Loss or excessive appetite

  • Insomnia or Hypersomnia

  • Extreme fatigue or statements of no energy

  • Little to no interest in hobbies and activities you once enjoyed

  • Intense irritability and anger

  • Worry of being a failure or not a good mother

  • Overwhelming emotions

  • Inability to focus or think clearly

  • Excessive stress, anxiety and/or panic attacks

  • Recurrent thoughts of harming yourself or your baby

Men

  • Insomnia or Hypersomnia

  • Hormonal changes

  • History of depression

  • Spousal Tension

  • Strained relationship with family

  • Excessive stress about becoming a  parent

  • Poor social functioning

  • Intense irritability and anger

  • Lack of support from others

  • Financial difficulties

  • Exclusion from the mother and baby bond

  • Recurrent thoughts of harming yourself or your baby

 

Make the Call

Unfortunately, many parents of newborns suffer in silence, with no idea of where to turn or who to call. They fail to recognize the symptoms and fall further into the hole of depression.

Both Postpartum Depression and Paternal Postnatal Depression can be treated. Help is available; your midwife, doctor and/or hospital will have resources for you. This is a serious matter and you need to seek a professional.

Call your care provider as soon as possible, if the signs and symptoms:

  • Don't fade after two weeks or are suicidal in nature

  • Are getting constant or debilitating

  • Make it hard for you to care for your baby or yourself

  • Have thoughts of harming your baby or other children

As a doula and a counselor, I have seen the beauty of mothers and fathers being restored after treatment. Their families have thrived and the bond with their child was better than ever! You are worth it!

Call the suicide hotline number — in the U.S.
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK
(1-800-273-8255)
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